bright


bright
bright adj
1 Bright, brilliant, radiant, luminous, lustrous, effulgent, refulgent, beaming, lambent, lucent, incandescent are comparable when they mean actually or seemingly shining or glowing with light.
Bright implies an opposition to dim or dull; it applies chiefly to things that vary in the degree in which they shed light or are pervaded by light, according to circumstances; thus, when used in reference to a fire or burning material (as coals), it suggests a good draft and flames; when used in reference to a day, it implies lack of clouds, fog, smoke, or other obstacles to the passage of sunlight
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a bright sky

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a bright star

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a bright sword

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bright eyes

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a bright color

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Brilliant (see also INTELLIGENT) implies conspicuous or intense brightness; it also often connotes scintillating or flashing light
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a well-cut diamond is the most brilliant of gems

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the sun is too brilliant for the human eye

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a brilliant smile

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Madame Olenska's face grew brilliant with pleasure— Wharton

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what one saw when one looked about was that brilliant blue world of stinging air and moving cloud— Cather

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Radiant, in contrast with bright and brilliant, stresses the emission or seeming emission of rays of light; it suggests, therefore, a property or power possessed by a thing rather than a quality ascribed to it because of its effect on the vision; thus, a celestial body is properly described as radiant only when it emits rays of light; a planet, no matter how bright it appears to the eye, is preferably described as bright or brilliant because it shines by reflected light
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Virtue could see to do what Virtue would by her own radiant light, though sun and moon were in the flat sea sunk— Milton

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The term, however, is sometimes used of anything that seems to give out light in the manner of the sun or a star
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in warlike armor drest, golden, all radiant!—Shelley

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Luminous, like radiant, suggests emission of light, but, unlike it, implies the sending forth of steady suffused glowing light; it is applicable to anything that shines by reflected light or that glows in the dark because of some special quality (as of physical state or chemical activity); thus, all celestial bodies are luminous, but only self-luminous bodies (stars in the strict astronomical sense) are also radiant
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phosphorus is a luminous substance

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As applied to color or to colored things the term implies more than bright, for it usually suggests a jewellike quality
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the luminous green of the emerald

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or iridescence
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the blue off Nantucket is not the miracle of luminous, translucent color off Sardinia— Lowes

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As applied to ideas or their expression, the term implies crystallike clearness and the absence of all obscurity
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a luminous treatment of a subject

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a luminous statement— Brougham

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Lustrous is applied only to an object whose surface reflects light; it therefore seldom implies pervading light but, rather, a brilliant or iridescent sheen or gloss
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the lustrous brass of a burnished lamp

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a lustrous enameled surface

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lustrous satin

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Effulgent and refulgent indicate resplendent or gleaming brilliance, and the latter implies further that the brilliance is reflected, sometimes from an unseen source
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effulgent loveliness

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a chandelier of refulgent crystal

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in arms they stood of golden panoply, refulgent host— Milton

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Beaming literally implies emission of a beam (see beam under RAY)
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rising moon, fair beaming, and streaming her silver light the boughs amang— Burns

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In its commonest use (as applied to looks or expression) beaming suggests a display of happiness, satisfaction, or benevolence
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the beaming eyes of children greeting Santa Claus

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broad beaming smile— George Eliot

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Lambent is applied to a thing (as a flame or a luminous body) which throws a play of light over an object or surface without rendering it brilliant or lustrous
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the lambent flame of genius . . . lights up the universe— Hazlitt

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lambent lightning-fire— Shelley

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Often lambent suggests the emission of soft gleams of light
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kind, quiet, nearsighted eyes, which his round spectacles magnified into lambent moons— Deland

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Lucent is a highly poetical or literary adjective that approaches luminous or, less often, lustrous in its meaning; it is usually applied to something transfigured by light (as from the sun or a fire)
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the lucent fume of the city's smoke rising up— Mackenzie

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till every particle glowed . . . and slowly seemed to turn to lucent amber— Gibson

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Incandescent suggests intense glowing brightness of or as if of an intensely heated body
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pots incandescent in the kiln

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an incandescent lamp

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set thoughts aglowing in incandescent language— Iglesias

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Analogous words: illuminated, illumined, lighted, lightened, enlightened (see ILLUMINATE): flashing, gleaming, glistening, sparkling (see FLASH vb): glowing, flaming (see BLAZE vb)
Antonyms: dull: dim
Contrasted words: dusky, murky, gloomy, *dark, obscure: *colorless, uncolored: *pale, pallid, ashen, livid
2 smart, quick-witted, brilliant, clever, *intelligent, knowing, alert
Analogous words: *sharp, keen, acute: *quick, ready, prompt, apt: precocious, advanced (see PREMATURE)
Antonyms: dense, dull
Contrasted words: *stupid, slow, crass, dumb: *lethargic, sluggish: phlegmatic, stolid, *impassive

New Dictionary of Synonyms. 2014.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • bright — W2S2 [braıt] adj comparative brighter superlative brightest ▬▬▬▬▬▬▬ 1¦(light)¦ 2¦(sunny)¦ 3¦(intelligent)¦ 4¦(colours)¦ 5¦(cheerful)¦ 6¦(successful)¦ 7 as bright as a button 8 look …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • Bright — ist der Name folgender Personen: Bette Bright, britische Rocksängerin Bill Bright (1921–2003), US amerikanischer Evangelist Bobby Bright (* 1952), US amerikanischer Politiker Cameron Bright (* 1993), kanadischer Schauspieler Charles Tilston… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Bright — may refer to:*Brightness, the perception of how dark or light a source of luminance is *Being bright , describing colloquially, something with intelligence (trait) *The Brights movement, a social movement promoting the naturalistic… …   Wikipedia

  • bright — [ braıt ] adjective *** ▸ 1 with strong color ▸ 2 full of light ▸ 3 intelligent ▸ 4 lively ▸ 5 likely to succeed ▸ + PHRASES 1. ) usually before noun bright colors are strong but not dark: She was wearing a bright red scarf. His eyes are bright… …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • bright´ly — bright «bryt», adjective, adverb, noun. –adj. 1. giving much light; shining: »The stars are bright, but sunshine is brighter. 2. very light or clear: »It is a bright day with no clouds. 3. Figurative. clever; quick witted; …   Useful english dictionary

  • Bright — Bright, a. [OE. briht, AS. beorht, briht; akin to OS. berht, OHG. beraht, Icel. bjartr, Goth. ba[ i]rhts. [root]94.] 1. Radiating or reflecting light; shedding or having much light; shining; luminous; not dark. [1913 Webster] The sun was bright o …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • bright — [braɪt] adjective FINANCE if share trading is bright, there is a lot of activity and prices are rising: • Trading will be relatively bright in the first half, with the Nikkei rising above 30,000. * * * bright UK US /braɪt/ adjective ► FINANCE,… …   Financial and business terms

  • bright — [adj1] shining, glowing in appearance ablaze, aglow, alight, argent, auroral, beaming, blazing, brilliant, burning, burnished, coruscating, dazzling, effulgent, flashing, fulgent, fulgid, glaring, gleaming, glistening, glittering, glossy, golden …   New thesaurus

  • bright — [brīt] adj. [ME < OE bryht, earlier beorht < IE base * bher eg , to gleam, white > BIRCH, Goth bairhts] 1. shining with light that is radiated or reflected; full of light 2. clear or brilliant in color or sound; vivid or intense 3.… …   English World dictionary

  • BRIGHT (J.) — BRIGHT JOHN (1811 1889) Homme politique britannique de premier plan et grande figure du libéralisme, John Bright est un industriel du Lancashire. Appartenant à une famille de quakers, il a reçu une bonne éducation, mais n’est pas passé par les… …   Encyclopédie Universelle


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